The Benefits of Using a Real Estate Photographer

Taken by Eniko Crozier

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo taken by Eniko Crozier

The Benefits of Using a Real Estate Photographer

 

 

When there are so many options for buyers to choose from and so little buyers to go around, what can help attract a buyer’s attention to your home? Proper real estate photography, that’s what!!!

 

Fact: Most home buyers today start their home shopping online. There are many websites to view homes on, from public ones like MLS to local site like MH&H to the realtor’s own website. As a seller, it is important for you that your home looks it’s best in every picture. When a realtor takes photos of the seller’s home with their cellphone, the pics are often too dark or too grainy for the potential buyer to connect with your home. This can cause them to completely skip over your home and choose to book a showing with the competition instead!

 

A seller needs a photographer that can connect with their home. One that can hilight all the benefits of living there, without distorting them. Whether it’s the special features or the little extras inside the home itself, the beautiful gardens & landscaping outside, or the outbuildings. A good photographer not only sees but feels those little subtleties in each property that makes it unique and special to any other property that is for sale. They recognize these features and focus on them to help make your property stand out above the rest!

 

With proper photos, when a potential buyer views your home online, they are drawn in because the photos help connect them to the property. Now they are booking that showing at your home, instead of skipping over it in favour of your competition!

 

 

Eniko Crozier, 

Real Estate Photographer and Real Estate Professional

Sutton Group-Kilkenny Real Estate

What Happened at an Accident Scene Between Appointments

woman in snow
I left their house with an offer in hand.

The snow might have been crunching, but I didn’t notice. I was practically floating.

After only seven days, the place was about to be sold. Better than that, both sides had been dreams to work with.

It’s the deal every agent wants. And I got it.

I put the car into gear and grinned while the car radio pumped out the perfect beat for celebration.

It was evening in January, and had been dark for hours. That morning I’d navigated the roads during icy rain, and the roads were a bit dicey now that everything had frozen again.

So I took it slow and steady.

There I was, bopping like a thrilled teenager and driving like a grandpa.

I grinned and danced for a few miles… and then I saw it.

There, in the ditch near the highway, was the overturned car. The wheels were up in the air and the lights were still on. A young man stood beside the car.

It must have just happened.

So I did what anyone else would do.

I drove on by and left him there.

Yes, really.

Aww, don`t worry. I turned around and came right back! (I told you it was dark and slippery, right?)

I pulled onto the shoulder and approached the young man. He looked to be maybe eighteen or twenty. He was pretty shaken up but didn’t appear to be hurt.

“You okay?” I called to him from the roadside.

“Yeah…”

Then it occurred to me someone else could be in that car… and not able to come out. Suddenly I was very glad for my warm coat and moccasin boots – I’d be able to come down and help if need be.

“Is anyone with you?”

“No, it’s just me.”

What a relief.

I offered him a ride, which he gladly took.

He pulled on the seatbelt and looked straight ahead, no doubt stunned by the accident. His request was to be taken home. I wasn’t sure that was better than going to the hospital, but we headed toward his home anyway.

You know… you can never tell by looking at someone what kind of home life they come from. I wondered about this young man. Would he be afraid to tell his parents about it? Would there be hell to pay when he got home? Luckily, car rides are great for getting to know someone, and I used the opportunity.

When we came to talking about his parents, he smiled and seemed to warm up to having a conversation.

“Oh no, I’m not worried about my dad,” he smiled.

With joy and gratitude in his voice and words, he told me how his dad has always been there for him, and they’re a solid, safe place for him in this crazy world.

I brought him home and waved him off, so thankful and relieved he was safe.

 

The next day, two exciting things happened.

First, the offer I’d delivered was accepted. Yay! SOLD sign, here I come!

The other cool thing that happened was that I got a phone call from the boy’s father.

He was so glad that I’d stopped to help his son. Not just that, but our conversation had brought peace and comfort to him in a pretty scary moment.

I was thrilled about selling the house.

But the most meaningful part of that day was hearing how anything I did or said encouraged someone else.

I read somewhere that a day’s success should not be measured by the harvest reaped, but by the seeds sown.

To me, that was a successful day.

Forget about money and houses and debt and stress – life is about people, and serving others is my true thrill.

What To Do When Your House Value Doesn’t Cover Your Debt

credit-cards

 

You probably have a pile of debt.

And it’s probably getting bigger, not smaller, right?

You’re not alone.

Most of us do, and it’s the kind that gets bigger every year.

According to Statistics Canada, 71% of all Canadians carry some form of debt (2012).

“Yes, that includes mortgages, but it also includes a growing pile borrowed to buy cars, new kitchens and many of the fashionable material trappings of the modern middle-class lifestyle”(1)

How do people deal with it?

Three ways.

They ignore it, letting debt climb every year, and hoping it gets better one day. We won’t go into why that’s a bad idea.

They refinance, using equity to pay off debts. Basically, it’s like using your house as a debit card, withdrawing cash whenever you need it. The plan is shaky, and depends on the market value to increase forever and without stopping. (Don’t think prices will drop? Our neighbors to the south thought that too…)

Or they sell, thinking the profits should be enough to dig them out.

That’s when they jolt awake to the fact that the sale won’t necessarily cover that pile of debt.

And it makes them crazy. The thought of getting a payday can make people do some wacky math.  (Just ask anyone who’s dealt with the division of an estate)

They’re shocked. Disappointed. Outraged and defiant even.

But here’s the thing.

The value of a property is not based on how much debt a person has.

Aren’t you glad? Imagine paying double for a house just because the guy who owns it happens to have loads and loads of debt. Would you pay it?

Umm, no.

And they won’t pay you either, sorry.

So what can you do when the sale doesn’t cover your debt?

Brace yourself, you’re about to hear things you already know.

 

  • Adjust your expectations. Remember – house value is not at all impacted by your finances. Besides, no one owes you financial freedom any more than you owe it to them.
  • Decide to stop adding to the debt pile now! It won’t grow if you don’t feed it.
  • Make a plan to pay off existing debt. Selling the house, when the value doesn’t cover it, is not the plan. Make a new one. Second jobs, selling other assets, reducing spending and throwing down higher payments… do what you must to climb out.

It’s that simple, and that difficult.

Overspending is killing us, and entitlement about house prices is not helping.

Welcome to the reason we’re all in debt up to our eyes.

I’m in the trenches with you, and the other 71% of Canadians.

What’s say we climb out instead of expecting others to pay our way?

 

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What is Your Loyalty to Friends and Family Costing You?

dog

Sometimes loyalty is a bad idea.

Even to family.

Or friends.

And especially to the neighbor’s uncle’s cousin’s friend.

Like the woman whose loyalty is causing her crippling pain to continue.

She had been seeing a physical therapist to help her with the constant pain she was in. For all the therapy she’d been receiving, her condition was getting worse, not better. There were other therapists who were skilled at treating this very problem.

“Maybe it’s time to try another therapist,” I said.

“Oh! But I can’t do that! I know somebody who works there.”

I let her statement just hang in the air, hoping she’d hear the lunacy of it.

After a moment, I chided with my signature brand of sarcasm.

“Oh. Well, in that case, you’d better just stay in pain.”

She smirked. “Good point.”

I guess she felt like her leaving would mean the therapist would be out of a job.
Which, of course, is totally false.

Loyalty can be a bad idea in real estate too.

Too often people have hired a realtor because their face is on a sign (here’s why that’s a dumb idea) or worse, because their neighbor’s friend’s son is an agent.

Which apparently means you are obligated to hire them.

Let’s just let that hang in the air for a moment so we can hear the lunacy of it.

Imagine this loyalty applied to doctors. Using only doctors who someone knows, regardless of their skill level or expertise, would be stupid.

“Oh, you’re an OBGYN? Perfect. Because I have this heart condition…”

Or medications.

“Oh, this life-saving pill was made by Valeant? Sorry, I only buy from Pfizer because my dad worked there for twenty years.”

Do you hear the lunacy of it?

“Oh, you’re a realtor specializing in rural properties and digital marketing strategy? Sorry, my brother Bob always uses another agent, so I have to too.”

Your loyalty should not be treated so cheaply.

Don’t give it away.

Especially not just because someone thinks you should.

Loyalty is precious and should be earned.

When it’s not earned, it’s treated poorly. Then you get poor results.

What else could you expect from a doctor not skilled in your area of need? From a therapist that can’t help you? Please, at least find out about the services a real estate agent offers before you make a decision on who you will hire to represent you.

Make them earn your loyalty.

And if they can’t, they didn’t deserve it in the first place.

Why January Is Spectacular

snow-angel-1443346000ieS

It’s over.

The rich taste of eggnog and aroma of delectable spiced ginger cookies have faded away.

Some people think that once the tree and lights are put away, winter’s sparkle is gone, and the grey must inevitably settle on us. Buckle up, it’s all dim and sad until spring…

Here’s the thing.

They’re wrong.

January shimmers with the romantic splendor of no other month.

At each country property I show, soft white snow trims the evergreens. Snow stretches atop fences like a garland and frost sparkles on branches like crystal fireflies. It’s almost as though the properties heard we were coming, and excitedly dressed up in their Sunday best.

It’s impossible to feel grey and dull when glimpsing that kind of dazzling display.

The other day the most stunning sun dog blazed in rainbows around the sun. I stopped in my tracks to admire them. It amazed me to think that their incredible beauty is simply light reflected by ice crystals.

That’s what I want. I want to reflect Light – to be the clean, clear crystal that reflects all the colors light contains.

What the heck does that mean, right?

I guess to me it means sharing. I want to share what I know and how I live and work so that my colleagues can gain success. Watching my peers grow and succeed gives me great joy. The joy is immensely more if I get to participate by helping somehow – even if it’s as an example seen from afar.

January’s clean, crisp freshness is its splendor.

I feel … like January.

I’m clean and free of the clutter of resentment and bitterness I once carried.

Before me is 2016 – a fresh layer of snow on which I get to make new tracks.

Wait – do you smell that?

*deep breath*

Yep, it’s adventure.

This is gonna be good…

What new tracks do you hope to walk this year?