The Man Whose House No Real Estate Agent Would Sell

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This tale might be fictional, but it’s based on several real, local people and events.
On things that actually, really happen around here.
Bill had been turned away from every brokerage in town. No one was willing to sell his house for him.

No agent, whether moral or shady, would touch it.

And it wasn’t because of the property;  the home and yard were in great shape.
The problem wasn’t the location.  Actually, it was a highly desirable place.

Buyers were searching for a property like his.

Still, no one would list it.

Why? Because Bill insisted on selling it for double its value.

Double.

Seriously.

What was worth $300,000 in the local market, he decided he would get $600,000. And he was completely dead serious.

So he left office after office, unable to find the agent who would invest their marketing dollars in such. No one was willing to torpedo their own reputation by listing such an impossibility.

Bill returned to his home and promptly stuck a sign in the yard. If no one would help him, he would do it himself.

Two things can happen at this point, and neither is a good thing.

  • Bill could sell the house to an unsuspecting private buyer who doesn’t realize it’s a horrible deal. Because ‘hey, it’s a private sale, so it must be cheaper’. Umm, no.Either the buyers come up with cash for the inflated price and buy something without any promise of equity for years and years and years or, more likely, the bank looks at the deal, and refuses to fund the mortgage. Because paying double is insane.
  • Or, most likely, and what happens most of the time, the property sits. And sits. And sits.
    Because people aren’t stupid. No one will pay double. Or even 30% more than it’s worth.

 

Look, if this forewarns you about anything, let it be this.

 

  • Beware: private sales aren’t always on the up and up.
  • Buying without an agent to protect you is risky
  • And, if you’re selling, for Pete’s sake, remember people aren’t idiots – not buyers, not agents – and be reasonable. People (and banks) will only pay what things are actually, legitimately worth. Anything more is flat out greed.

 

Have you ever purchased an over-priced home? Why?


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