Don’t Be a Sucker About Getting “Top Dollar”

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Every seller wants top dollar, and every buyer wants to avoid paying top dollar.

Your agent – whether buyer’s agent or seller’s agent – wants the best dollar for you and them.

Is it win-win-win, or does someone have to end up being the sucker?

If you’re the sucker, would you know it? 

 

You Might be a Sucker if… (4 Ways To Tell)

If you think “Market value” is a fanciful figure plucked from thin air that is greatly affected by nostalgia, sentiment or greed-inflated estimates… you might be a sucker. 

Market value is a calculation based on factual research – this is about real numbers and trends in a specific locale. Think fact, not fiction.

 

If you think your house is worth more than everyone else’s just because you’re you, and if you don’t mind your family, friends and neighbors seeing your sky-high price… you might be a sucker.
You have been made a fool by pride, and everyone can see it on your price tag.

I have done this next one and not only did I not get a sale, neither did my sellers so it didn’t do anyone good.

If you are an agent who, desperate for a listing, agrees to list a house way above market value just to appease a client who will not heed the voice of reason … you might be a sucker.
People don’t just see your client’s sky-high price, they see your reputation on that sign too.  Keep it real, folks.
If you hire an agent because they promise you a higher sell price than any other agent… you might be a sucker. Market value is market value. Not even agents can change that. Price is only one small factor when hiring an agent.

 

Have you been a sucker lately?

 

 

This Post Has One Comment

  1. Jeff Stern

    Tina, what a great topic and you were so genuine in your comments. I would also add that you are a sucker if you listen to family, co-workers and friends opinion of value that is greater than the value resulting from a Professional REALTOR® Comparative Market Analysis Report. Facts don’t lie and banks won’t finance over-value purchases. All that results is a property with a lengthy on market history that can scare off potential buyers that wonder why it never sold and what is wrong with the property.

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